SBE 9plus

SBE 911plus CTD

Premium profiling Conductivity, Temperature, Pressure, eight channels for auxiliary sensors, interface for dual C & T sensors, with 24 Hz sampling. Primary oceanographic research tool chosen by world's leading institutions.

The SBE 911plus CTD is the primary oceanographic research tool used by the world’s leading institutions, providing 24 Hz sampling with an SBE 9plus CTD Unit and SBE 11plus V2 Deck Unit. The 911plus system provides real-time data collection over 10,000 meters of cable (single- or multi-conductor electro-mechanical sea cable, slip-ring equipped winch, and computer for data display and logging supplied by user). The 911plus is easily integrated with an SBE 32 Carousel Water Sampler for real-time or autonomous auto-fire operations.

The 911plus’ pump-controlled, T-C ducted flow minimizes salinity spiking caused by ship heave and allows for slow descent rates without slowing sensor responses, improving dynamic accuracy and resolving small scale structure in the water column. One Conductivity and one Temperature sensor (fitted with TC Duct and constant-flow pump) are included. An optional second (redundant) pair of T and C sensors and pump can be easily installed. The 911plus supports numerous auxiliary sensors with eight A/D channels.

FEATURES

  • SBE 9plus CTD Unit for depths to 6800 or 10,500 m, with:
    - SBE 3plus premium Temperature sensor, SBE 4C Conductivity sensor, Digiquartz® Pressure sensor, SBE 5T pump.
    - Communication and power support for up to eight auxiliary voltage sensors.
    - Interface for dual C & T sensors (sensors optional).
    - Modem channel for real-time SBE 32 Carousel Water Sampler control.
    - Stainless steel protection cage.
  • SBE 11plus Deck Unit with NMEA 0183 interface for GPS data, 12-bit A/D channel for surface PAR sensor, 115/230 VAC operation, LED readout for raw data, audible bottom contact or altimeter alarm, remote pressure output (useful as input signal for towed vehicle control), programmable serial data output with up to seven variables in engineering units, free-standing cabinet, and kit for mounting in a standard 19-inch electronics rack.
  • Seasoft© V2 Windows software package (setup, data upload, real-time data acquisition, and data processing).
  • Five-year limited warranty.

COMPONENTS

  • Unique internal-field conductivity cell permits use of TC-Duct, minimizing salinity spiking.
  • Aged and pressure-protected thermistor has a long history of exceptional accuracy and stability.
  • Digiquartz® pressure sensor with temperature compensation is available in five ranges (to 10,500 m).
  • Pump runs continuously, providing correlation of CTD and plumbed auxiliary sensor measurements.

OPTIONS

  • Aluminum (6800 m) or titanium (10,500 m) housing; XSG/AG or wet-pluggable MCBH connectors.
  • Secondary temperature and conductivity sensors (and pump) for redundant T and C measurements.
  • Auxiliary sensors — dissolved oxygen, pH, fluorescence, radiance (PAR), light transmission, turbidity, altimeter, etc.
  • SBE 32 Carousel Water Sampler.
  • SBE 17plus V2 Searam for in-situ power and recording, and programmable Carousel bottle firing (system referred to as 917plus).
  • Serial Data Uplink for 9600 baud data pass-thru on shared CTD telemetry channel.
  • RS-232 serial output for use with AUV/ROV logging CTD data.
  • Bottom Contact switch.
  • Manual pump control or water contact pump control (typically used for fresh water applications).
  • Plastic shipping case.

Measurement Range

Conductivity 0 to 7 S/m
Temperature -5 to +35 °C
Pressure 0 to full scale — 1400/2000/4200/6800/10,500 m (2000/3000/6000/10,000/15,000 psia)

Initial Accuracy

Conductivity ± 0.0003 S/m
Temperature ± 0.001 °C
Pressure ± 0.015% of full scale range

Typical Stability

Conductivity 0.0003 S/m per month
Temperature 0.0002 °C per month
Pressure 0.02% of full scale per year

Resolution (at 24 Hz)

Conductivity 0.00004 S/m
Temperature 0.0002 °C
Pressure 0.001% of full scale

Miscellaneous

Time Response 1 Conductivity & Temperature 0.065 sec; Pressure 0.015 sec
Master Clock Error Contribution 2 Conductivity 0.00005 S/m; Temperature 0.00016 °C; Pressure 0.3 dbar (for 680 m [10,000 psia] sensor)
Auxiliary Sensors Power out 1 A at +14.3 V; Input range 0-5 VDC; Initial accuracy ± 0.005 V;
Stability 0.001 volts/month; Resolution 12 bits; Time response 5.5 Hz 2-pole Butterworth Low Pass Filter.
Sea Cable Inner conductor resistance 0 to 350 ohms
Modem Baud Rate 300 baud (30 characters/sec, full duplex)
9plus Housing, Depth Rating, Weight (with pump & cage) Aluminum; 6800 m; in air 25 kg, in water 16 kg.
Titanium; 10,500 m; in air 29 kg, in water 20 kg.
11plus Dimensions 13.0 x 37.5 x 44.4 cm; 48.3 cm edge-to-edge for mounting brackets.
AC power input 130 watts at 115 or 230 VAC 50-400 Hz.

1 Single pole approximation including sensor and acquisition system contributions.
2 Based on five-year worst-case error budget including ambient temperature influence of 1 ppm total over -20 to +70 °C plus 1 ppm first year drift plus four additional year's drift at 0.3 ppm per year.

 

The list below includes (as applicable) the current product brochure, manual, and quick guide; software manual(s); and application notes.

Older product manuals, organized by instrument firmware version, are also available for the SBE 9plus and SBE 11plus V2.

Title Type Publication Date PDF File
SBE 911plus Brochure Product Brochure Monday, December 29, 2014 911plusbrochureDec14.pdf
SBE 9plus Manual Product Manual Monday, February 9, 2015 9plus_018.pdf
SBE 11plus Manual Product Manual Monday, February 9, 2015 11pV2_017.pdf
SBE 17plus V2 Manual Product Manual Monday, February 9, 2015 17plus_013.pdf
Seasave V7 Manual Software Manual Tuesday, March 18, 2014 Seasave_7.23.2.pdf
SBE Data Processing Manual Software Manual Tuesday, March 18, 2014 SBEDataProcessing_7.23.2.pdf
Seasave V7 Quick Guide Software Quick Guide Tuesday, August 3, 2010 Seasave_ReferenceSheet_001.pdf
Technical Note: Avoiding Oil Contamination on Deployment in Oil Spill Technical Note Thursday, June 3, 2010 AvoidOilContaminationOnDeployment-General.pdf
Technical Note: Cleaning for CTDs used in Oil Spill Technical Note Thursday, July 21, 2011 SimpleCleaningProtocols_OilSpillRecovery_Jul2011.pdf
Technical Note: Oil Spill Deployment Protocols for SBE 9plus CTD Technical Note Thursday, June 3, 2010 SBE9plus_OilSpillDeploymentProtocols.pdf
AN02D: Instructions for Care and Cleaning of Conductivity Cells Application Notes Monday, March 10, 2014 appnote2DMar14.pdf
AN06: Determination of Sound Velocity from CTD Data Application Notes Tuesday, February 2, 2010 appnote06Aug04.pdf
AN10: Compressibility Compensation of Sea-Bird Conductivity Sensors Application Notes Tuesday, May 7, 2013 appnote10May13.pdf
AN11S: Using Biospherical Surface PAR Light Sensor with SBE 11plus Deck Unit Application Notes Tuesday, February 9, 2010 appnote11SFeb10.pdf
AN12-1: Pressure Port Oil Refill Procedure and Nylon Capillary Fitting Replacement Application Notes Friday, September 12, 2008 appnote12-1Sep08.pdf
AN14: 1978 Practical Salinity Scale Application Notes Thursday, January 12, 1989 appnote14.pdf
AN15: TC Duct Assembly & Plumbing Installation Application Notes Friday, October 12, 2012 appnote15Oct12.pdf
AN16: Entering Calibration Coefficients for D&A Instruments (Campbell Scientific) OBS-3 Optical Backscatter Sensor Application Notes Thursday, September 18, 2014 appnote16Sep14.pdf
AN31: Computing Temperature and Conductivity Slope and Offset Correction Coefficients from Laboratory Calibrations and Salinity Bottle Samples Application Notes Monday, February 22, 2010 appnote31Feb10.pdf
AN34: Instructions for Use of Conductivity Cell Filling and Storage Device PN 50087 and 50087.1 Application Notes Saturday, October 13, 2012 appnote34Oct12.pdf
AN35: Use of SBE 911plus with General Oceanics 1015 Rosette® Application Notes Thursday, February 13, 1992 appnote35.pdf
AN36A: Installation of P/N 50094 Conductivity Cell Tubing Connector Kit Application Notes Monday, April 13, 1998 appnote36a.pdf
AN38: TC Duct Fundamentals Application Notes Tuesday, July 10, 2012 appnote38Jul12.pdf
AN42: ITS-90 Temperature Scale Application Notes Thursday, February 13, 2014 appnote42Feb14.pdf
AN57: Connector Care and Cable Installation Application Notes Tuesday, May 13, 2014 appnote57Jan14.pdf
AN64-1: Plumbing Installation - SBE 43 DO Sensor and Pump on a CTD Application Notes Wednesday, April 16, 2008 appnote64-1Apr08.pdf
AN67: Editing Sea-Bird .hex Data Files Application Notes Monday, October 15, 2001 appnote67.pdf
AN68: Using USB Ports to Communicate with Sea-Bird Instruments Application Notes Friday, October 19, 2012 appnote68Oct12.pdf
AN69: Conversion of Pressure to Depth Application Notes Monday, July 1, 2002 appnote69.pdf
AN73: Using Instruments with Pressure Sensors at Elevations Above Sea Level Application Notes Friday, February 28, 2014 appnote73Feb14.pdf
AN86: Change to SBE 9plus CTD Bottom Contact Switch Connector (JB6) Application Notes Wednesday, February 14, 2007 appnote86Feb07.pdf
AN94: Wide-Range Conductivity Calibration Application Notes Tuesday, June 4, 2013 Appnote94Jun13.pdf
AN95: Setting Up Teledyne Benthos Altimeter with Sea-Bird Profiling CTD Application Notes Sunday, January 12, 2014 Appnote95.pdf
SeatermAF© is a terminal program for setup and data upload of Sea-Bird instruments that include Auto-Fire capability for operating a water sampler autonomously on non-conducting cable. SeatermAF is part of our Seasoft V2 software suite.
Version 2.14 released September 17, 2013
SeatermAF_V2_1_4.exe for Windows XP/Vista/7


Seaterm© is a terminal program for setup and data upload of a wide variety of older Sea-Bird instruments. Seaterm is part of our Seasoft V2 software suite.
Version 1.59 released October 10, 2007
Seaterm_Win32_V1_59.exe for Windows XP/Vista/7


Seasave V7© acquires, converts, and displays real-time or archived raw data from Sea-Bird profiling CTDs and thermosalinographs, as well as the SBE 16 family of moored CTDs. Seasave V7 is part of our Seasoft V2 software suite.
Version 7.23.2 released March 18, 2014
SeasaveV7_23_2.exe for Windows XP/Vista/7


SBE Data Processing© consists of modular, menu-driven routines for converting, editing, processing, and plotting of oceanographic data acquired with Sea-Bird profiling CTDs, thermosalinographs, and the SBE 16 and 37 families of moored CTDs. SBE Data Processing is part of our Seasoft V2 software suite.
Version 7.23.2 released March 18, 2014
SBEDataProcessing_Win32_V7_23_2.exe for Windows XP/Vista/7


What are the typical data processing steps recommended for each instrument?

Section 3: Typical Data Processing Sequences in the SBE Data Processing manual provides typical data processing sequences for our profiling CTDs, moored CTDs, and thermosalinographs. Typical values for aligning, filtering, etc. are provided in the sections detailing each module of the software. This information is also documented in the software's Help file. To download the software and/or manual, go to SBE Data Processing.

What are the recommended practices for connectors - mating and unmating, cleaning corrosion, and replacing?

Mating and Unmating Connectors:

It is important to prepare and mate connectors correctly, both in terms of the costs to repair them and to preserve data quality. Leaking connectors cause noisy data and even potential system shutdowns. Application Note 57: Connector Care and Cable Installation describes the proper care and installation of connectors for Sea-Bird instruments. The Application Note covers connector cleaning and cable or dummy plug installation, locking sleeve installation, and cold weather tips.

Checking for Leakage and Cleaning Corrosion on Connectors:

If there has been leakage, it will show up as green-colored corrosion product. Performing the following steps can usually reverse the effect of the leak:

  1. Thoroughly clean the connector with water, followed by alcohol.
  2. Give the connector surfaces a light coating of silicon grease.

Re-mate the connectors properly — see Application Note 57: Connector Care and Cable Installation and 9-minute video covering O-ring, connector, and cable maintenance.

Replacing Connectors:

  • The main concern when replacing a bulkhead connector is that the o-rings on the connector and end cap must be prepared and installed correctly; if they are not, the instrument will flood. See the question below for general procedure on handling o-rings.
  • Use a thread-locking compound on the connector threads to prevent the new connector from loosening, which could also lead to flooding.
  • If the cell guard must be removed to open the instrument, take extra care not to break the glass conductivity cell.

Which Sea-Bird profiling CTD is best for my application?

Sea-Bird makes four main profiling CTD instruments, as well as several profiling CTD instruments for specialized applications.

In order of decreasing cost, the four main profiling CTD instruments are the SBE 911plus CTD, SBE 25plus Sealogger CTD, SBE 19plus SeaCAT Profiler CTD, and SBE 49 FastCAT CTD Sensor:

  • The SBE 911plus is the world’s most accurate CTD. Used by most leading oceanographic institutions, the SBE 911plus is recognized for superior performance, reliability, and ease-of-use. Features include: modular conductivity and temperature sensors, Digiquartz pressure sensor, TC-Ducted Flow and pump-controlled time response, 24 Hz sampling, 8 A/D channels and power for auxiliary sensors, modem channel for real-time water sampler control without data interruption, and optional 9600 baud serial data uplink. The SBE 911plus system consists of: SBE 9plus Underwater Unit and SBE 11plus Deck Unit. The SBE 9plus can be used in self-contained mode when integrated with the optional SBE 17plus V2 Searam. The Searam provides battery power, internal 24 Hz data logging, and an auto-fire interface to an SBE 32 Carousel Water Sampler to trigger bottle closures at pre-programmed depths.
  • The SBE 25plus Sealogger is the choice for research work from smaller vessel not equipped for real-time operation, or use by multi-discipline scientific groups requiring configuration flexibility and good accuracy and resolution on a smaller budget. The SBE 25plus is a battery-powered, internally-recording CTD featuring the same modular C & T sensors used on the SBE 9plus CTD, an integral strain gauge pressure sensor, 16 Hz sampling, 2 GB of memory, TC-Ducted Flow and pump-controlled time response, and 8 A/D channels plus 2 RS-232 channels and power for auxiliary sensors. Real-time data can be transmitted via RS-232 simultaneous with data recording. The SBE 25plus integrates easily with an SBE 32 Carousel Water Sampler or SBE 55 ECO Water Sampler for real-time or autonomous operation.
  • The SBE 19plus V2 SeaCAT Profiler is known throughout the world for good performance, reliability, and ease-of-use. An economical, battery-powered, internally-recording mini-CTD, the SBE 19plus V2 is a good choice for basic hydrography, fisheries research, environmental monitoring, and sound velocity profiling. Features include 4 Hz sampling, 6 differential A/D channels plus 1 RS-232 channel and power for auxiliary sensors, 64 MB of memory, and pump-controlled conductivity time response. Real-time data can be transmitted via RS-232 simultaneous with data recording, The SBE 19plus V2 integrates easily with an SBE 32 Carousel Water Sampler or SBE 55 ECO Water Sampler for real-time or autonomous operation.
  • The SBE 49 FastCAT is an integrated CTD sensor intended for towed vehicle, ROV, AUV, or other autonomous profiling applications. Real-time data ‑ in raw format or in engineering units ‑ is logged or telemetered by the vehicle to which it is mounted. The SBE 49’s pump-controlled, TC-ducted flow minimizes salinity spiking, and its 16 Hz sampling provides very high spatial resolution of oceanographic structures and gradients. The SBE 49 has no memory or internal batteries. The SBE 49 integrates easily with an SBE 32 Carousel Water Sampler or SBE 55 ECO Water Sampler for real-time operation.

The specialized profiling CTD instruments are the SBE 52-MP Moored Profiler, Glider Payload CTD, and SBE 41/41CP Argo CTD module:

  • The SBE 52-MP Moored Profiler is a conductivity, temperature, pressure sensor, designed for moored profiling applications in which the instrument makes vertical profile measurements from a device that travels vertically beneath a buoy, or from a buoyant sub-surface sensor package that is winched up and down from a bottom-mounted platform. The 52-MP's pump-controlled, TC-ducted flow minimizes salinity spiking. The 52-MP can optionally be configured with an SBE 43F dissolved oxygen sensor.
  • The Glider Payload CTD measures conductivity, temperature, and pressure, and optionally, dissolved oxygen (with the modular SBE 43F DO sensor). It is a modular, low-power profiling instrument for autonomous gliders with the high accuracy necessary for research, inter-comparison with moored observatory sensors, updating circulation models, and leveraging data collection opportunities from operational vehicle missions. The pressure-proof module allows glider users to exchange CTDs (and DO sensors) in the field without opening the glider pressure hull.
  • Argo floats are neutrally buoyant at depth, where they are carried by currents until periodically increasing their displacement and slowing rising to the surface. The SBE 41/41CP CTD Module obtains the latest CTD profile each time the Argo float surfaces. At the surface, the float transmits in-situ measurements and drift track data to the ARGOS satellite system. The SBE 41/41CP can be integrated with Sea-Bird's Navis floatNavis float with Biogeochemical Sensors, or floats from other manufacturers. The SBE 41N CTD is integrated with Sea-Bird's Navis Float with Integrated Biogeochemical Sensors.

See Product Selection Guide for a table summarizing the features of our profiling CTDs.

What are the recommended practices for storing sensors at low temperatures, and deploying at low temperatures or in frazil or pancake ice?

General

Large numbers of Sea-Bird conductivity instruments have been used in Arctic and Antarctic programs.

Special accommodation to keep temperature, conductivity, oxygen, and optical sensors at or above 0 C is advised. Often, the CTD is brought inside protective doors between casts to achieve this.

Conductivity Cell

When freezing is possible, we recommend that the conductivity sensor be stored dry. Remove larger droplets of water by blowing through the cell. Do not use compressed air, which typically contains oil vapor. Attach a length of Tygon tubing to each end of the conductivity cell to close the cell ends. See Application Note 2D: Instructions for Care and Cleaning of Conductivity Cells for details.

There are several considerations to weigh when contemplating deployments at low temperatures in general, and in frazil or pancake ice:

  • Ensure that the instrument is at or above water temperature before it is deployed. If the cell gets colder than 0 to -2 ºC while on deck, when it enters the water a layer of ice forms inside the cell as the cell warms to ocean temperature. If ice forms inside the conductivity cell, measurements will be low of correct until the ice layer melts and disappears. Thin layers of ice will not hurt the conductivity cell, but repeated ice formation on the electrodes will degrade the conductivity calibration (at levels of 0.001 to 0.020 psu) and thicker layers of ice can lead to glass fracture and permanent damage of the cell.
  • For accurate measurements, keep ice out of the sensing region of the conductivity cell. The conductivity measurement involves determining the electrical resistance of the water inside the sensor. Ice is essentially a non-conductor. To the extent that ice displaces the water, the conductivity will register (very) misleadingly low. Some type of screening is necessary to keep ice out of the cell. This is relatively easy to arrange for the Sea-Bird conductivity cell, which is an electrode-type cell, because its sensing region is totally inside a long tube; plastic mesh could be positioned at each end and would have zero effect on accuracy and stability.

The above considerations apply to all known conductivity sensor types, whether electrode or inductive types. 

If deploying at low temperatures but no surface frazil or pancake ice is present, rinse the conductivity cell in one of the following salty solutions (salty water depresses the freezing point) to prevent freezing during deployment. But this does not mean you can store the cell in one of these solutions outside . . . it will freeze.

  • Solution of 1% Triton in sterile seawater (use 0.5-micron filtered seawater or boiled seawater),   or
  • Brine solution (distilled seawater or homemade salt solution that is higher than 35 psu in salinity).

Note that there is still a risk of forming ice inside the conductivity cell if deploying through frazil or pancake ice on the surface, if the freezing point of the salt water is the same as the water temperature. Therefore, we recommend that you deploy the conductivity cell in a dry state for these deployments.

Commercially available alcohol or glycol antifreezes contain trace amounts of oils that will coat the conductivity cell and the electrodes, causing a calibration shift, and consequently result in errors in the data. Do not use alcohol or glycol in the conductivity cell.

Temperature Sensor

In general, neither the accuracy of the temperature measurement nor the survival of the temperature sensor will be affected by ice.

Oxygen Sensor

For the SBE 43 and SBE 63 Dissolved Oxygen sensor, avoid prolonged exposure to freezing temperature, including during shipment. Do not store the with water (fresh or seawater), Triton solution, alcohol, or glycol in the plenum. The best precaution is to keep the sensor indoors or in some shelter out of the cold weather.

How should I pick the pressure sensor range for my CTD? Would the highest range give me the most flexibility in using the CTD?

While the highest range does give you the most flexibility in using the CTD, it is at the expense of accuracy and resolution. It is advantageous to use the lowest range pressure sensor compatible with your intended maximum operating depth, because accuracy and resolution are proportional to the pressure sensor's full scale range. For example, the SBE 9plus pressure sensor has initial accuracy of 0.015% of full scale, and resolution of 0.001% of full scale. Comparing a 2000 psia (1400 meter) and 6000 psia (4200 meter) pressure sensor:

  • 1400 meter pressure sensor ‑ initial accuracy is 0.21 meters and resolution is 0.014 meters
  • 4200 meter pressure sensor ‑ initial accuracy is 0.63 meters and resolution is 0.042 meters

How many/what kind of spares should I have on ship for my SBE 9plus?

The most complete backup system would be another SBE 9plus, to allow for very rapid system swaps. This is important if your stations are close together and there is limited time between CTD casts. However, it is the most expensive option.

The next step down would be an SBE 9plus without sensors. In this case, a system failure would require swapping sensors and pumps to the new unit. This is not difficult, but it is somewhat time consuming. If you have several hours between casts it should not be a problem.

The next option would be to carry spare boards and try and troubleshoot the problem and replace boards. If you have a technician that can do this it is not a bad option. However, it requires some clean and dry lab space to open the CTD and work. You will also have to properly re-seal the CTD. Based upon experience, the SBE 9plus does not fail very often. The most common failure is the main DC-to-DC converter. Other than that, there are very few system failures. However, there are several components that can be damaged through mistakes or misuse. The most catastrophic, other that losing the whole CTD, is to plug the sea cable into the bottom contact connector on the bottom end cap; if this happens, several circuit boards will be destroyed (Note: In 2007 Sea-Bird began using a female bulkhead connector on the 9plus for the bottom contact switch, to differentiate from the sea cable connector and prevent this error. If desired, older CTDs can be retrofitted with the female connector.).

If the budget allows it, we recommend getting a complete backup SBE 9plus, including sensors. If there is any problem, return the malfunctioning instrument for repair and continue sampling with the spare instrument. A complete backup also provides you with spare sensors, so you can rotate 1 set through calibration and continue to operate.

I am ordering a CTD and want to use auxiliary sensors. Should I order them from Sea-Bird also, or deal directly with the sensors’ manufacturers?

This depends on your own expertise and resources. We have extensive experience in integrating and supporting a wide range of auxiliary sensors, but not everything under the sun. We have a large list of commonly used sensors that we routinely offer for sale (see Third Party Sensor Configuration).

When you purchase any of these auxiliary sensors from Sea-Bird, we are able to apply this experience to integrating the sensors with the CTD. The integration includes installing the sensors (with appropriate mounting kits and cables) in a manner that puts each sensor in the best possible orientation for optimum performance. It also includes configuring the CTD system and software to accept the sensors’ inputs and properly display the data, and testing the entire system, typically in a chilled saltwater bath overnight, to confirm proper operation. Having done the integration, we also support the entire system in terms of follow-on service and end-user support with operational and data analysis questions *. There is significant added value in our integration service, and there is some extra cost for this, compared to doing it yourself. However, we do not base our business on selling services, and the prices charged for Third Party sensors carry minimal mark-ups that vary depending on the pricing we are offered by the manufacturers. In some cases we can sell at the manufacturer's list price, and in others we have to add margin.

*Notes:
1. As described in our Warranty, auxiliary sensors manufactured by other companies are warranted only to the limit of the warranties provided by their original manufacturers (typically 1 year).
2. Click here for information on repairing / recalibrating auxiliary sensors manufactured by other companies.

Is it necessary to put my instrument in water to test it? Will I destroy the conductivity cell if I test it in air?

It is not necessary to put the instrument in water to test it. It will not hurt the conductivity cell to be in air.

If there is a pump on the instrument, it should not be run for extended periods in air.

  • Profiling instruments (SBE 9plus, 19, 19plus, 19plus V2, 25, 25plus, 49) and some moored instruments (all pumped MicroCATs with integral dissolved oxygen (DO), and pumped MicroCATs without DO with firmware 3.0 and later) do not turn on the pump unless the conductivity frequency is above a specified minimum value (minimum value is hard-wired in 9plus, user-programmable in other instruments). This prevents the pump from turning on in air. See the instrument manual for details.
  • If your instrument does not check for conductivity frequency before turning on the pump: 
    - For moored SeaCATs (16, 16plus, 16plus-IM, 16plus V2, 16plus-IM V2): Disconnect the pump cable for the test. 
    - For older pumped MicroCATs: orient the MicroCAT to provide an upright U-shape for the plumbing. Then fill the inside of the pump head with water via the pump exhaust tubing; this will provide enough lubrication to prevent pump damage during brief testing.

How often do I need to have my instrument and/or auxiliary sensors recalibrated? Can I recalibrate them myself?

General recommendations:

  • Profiling CTD — recalibrate once/year, but possibly less often if used only occasionally. We recommend that you return the CTD to Sea-Bird for recalibration. (In principle, it is possible for calibration to be performed elsewhere, if the calibration facility has the appropriate equipment andtraining. However, the necessary equipment is quite expensive to buy and maintain.) In between laboratory calibrations, take field salinity samples to document conductivity cell drift.
  • Thermosalinograph — recalibrate at least once/year, but possibly more often depending on the degree of bio-fouling in the water.
  • DO sensor —
    — SBE 43 — recalibrate once/year, but possibly less often if used only occasionally and stored correctly (see Application Note 64), and also depending on the amount of fouling and your ability to do some simple validations (see Application Note 64-2)
    — SBE 63 — recalibrate once/year, but possibly less often if used only occasionally and stored correctly and also depending on the amount of fouling and your ability to do some simple validations (see SBE 63 manual)
  • pH sensor — recalibrate every 6 months
  • Transmissometer — usually do not require recalibration for several years. Recalibration at the manufacturer’s factory is the most practical method.

Profiling CTDs:

We often have requests from customers to have some way to know if the CTD is out of calibration. The general character of sensor drift in Sea-Bird conductivity, temperature, and pressure measurements is well known and predictable. However, it is very difficult to know precisely how far a CTD calibration has drifted over time unless you have access to a very sophisticated calibration lab. In our experience, an annual calibration schedule will usually maintain the CTD accuracy to within 0.01 psu in Salinity.

Conductivity drifts as a change in slope as a result of accumulated fouling that coats the inside of the conductivity cell, reducing the area of the cell and causing an under-reporting of conductivity. Fouling consists of both biological growth and accumulated oils and inorganic material (sediment). Approximately 95% of fouling occurs as the cell passes through oil and other contaminants floating on the sea surface. Most conductivity fouling is episodic, as opposed to gradual and steady drift. Most fouling events are small and mostly transitory, but they have a cumulative affect over time. A severe fouling event, such as deployment through an oil spill, could have a dramatic but only partially recoverable effect, causing an immediate jump shift toward lower salinity. As fouling becomes more severe, the fit becomes increasingly non-linear and offsets and slopes no longer produce adequate correction, and return to Sea-Bird for factory calibration is required. Frequently checking conductivity drift is likely to be the most productive data assurance measure you can take. Comparing conductivity from profile to profile (as a routine check) will allow you to detect sudden changes that may indicate a fouling event and the need for cleaning and/or re-calibration.

Temperature generally drifts slowly, at a steady rate and predictably as a simple offset at the rate of about 1-2 millidegrees per year. This is approximately equal to 1-2 parts per million in Salinity error (very small).

Pressure sensor drift is also an offset, and annual comparisons to an accurate barometer to determine offset will generally keep the sensor within specification for several years, particularly as the sensors age over time.

Can I use a pressure sensor above its rated pressure?

Digiquartz pressure sensors are used in the SBE 9plus, 53, and 54. The SBE 16plus V2, 16plus-IM V2, 19plus V2, and 26plus can be equipped with either a Druck pressure sensor or a Digiquartz pressure sensor. All other instruments that include pressure use a Druck pressure sensor.

  • The overpressure rating for a Digiquartz (as stated by Paroscientific) is 1.2 * full scale. The sensor will provide data values above 100% of rated full scale; however, Sea-Bird does not calibrate beyond the rated full scale.
  • The overpressure rating for a Druck (as stated by Druck) is 1.5 * full scale. The sensor will provide data values above 100% of rated full scale; however, Sea-Bird does not calibrate beyond the rated full scale.

Note: If you use the instrument above the rated range, you do so at your own risk; the product will not be covered under warranty.

I want to add an auxiliary sensor to my CTD (SBE 9plus, 16, 16plus, 16plus-IM, 16plus V2, 16plus-IM V2, 19, 19plus, 19plus V2, 21, 25, or 25plus). Assuming the auxiliary sensor is compatible with the instrument, what is the procedure?

Adding the sensor(s) is reasonably straightforward:

  1. Mount the sensor; a poor mounting scheme can result in poor data.
    Note: If the new sensor will be part of a pumped system, the existing plumbing must be modified; consult Sea-Bird for details.
  2. Attach the new cable.
  3. (not applicable to 9plus used with 11plus Deck Unit) Using the appropriate terminal program — Enable the channel(s) in the CTD, using the appropriate instrument command.
  4. Using Seasave V7 or SBE Data Processing — Modify the CTD configuration (.con or .xmlcon) file to reflect the new sensor, and type in the calibration coefficients.

What is the function of the zinc anode on some instruments?

A zinc anode attracts corrosion and prevents aluminum from corroding until all the zinc is eaten up. Sea-Bird uses zinc anodes on an instrument if it has an aluminum housing and/or end cap. Instruments with titanium or plastic housings and end caps (for example, SBE 37 MicroCAT) do not require an anode.

Check the anode(s) periodically to verify that it is securely fastened and has not been eaten away.

Do I need to clean the exterior of my instrument before shipping it to Sea-Bird for calibration?

Remove as much biological material and/or anti-foul coatings as possible before shipping. Sea-Bird cannot place an instrument with a large amount of biological material or anti-foul coating on the housing in our calibration bath; if we need to clean the exterior before calibration, we will charge you for this service.

  • To remove barnacles, plug the ends of the conductivity cell to prevent the cleaning solution from getting into the cell. Then soak the entire instrument in white vinegar for a few minutes. After scraping off the barnacles and marine growth, rinse the instrument well with fresh water.
  • To remove anti-foul paint, use a Heavy Duty Scotch-Brite pad (http://www.3m.com/us/home_leisure/scotchbrite/products/scrubbing_scouring.html) or similar scrubbing device.

I want to change the pressure sensor on my CTD, swapping it as needed to get the best data for a given deployment depth. Can I do this myself, or do I need to send the instrument to Sea-Bird?

On most of our instruments, replacement of the pressure sensor should be performed at Sea-Bird. We cannot extend warranty coverage if you replace the pressure sensor yourself.

However, we recognize that you might decide to go ahead and do it yourself because of scheduling/cost issues. Some guidelines follow:

  1. Perform the swap and carefully store the loose sensor on shore in a laboratory or electronics shop environment, not on a ship. The pressure sensor is fairly sensitive to shock, and a loose sensor needs to be stored carefully. Dropping the sensor will break it.
  2. Some soldering and unsoldering is required. Verify that the pressure sensor is mounted properly in your instrument. Properly re-grease and install the o-rings, or the instrument will flood.
  3. Once the sensor is installed, back-fill it with oil. Sea-Bird uses a vacuum-back filling apparatus that makes this job fairly easy. We can provide a drawing showing the general design of the apparatus, which can be modified and constructed by your engineers.
  4. For the most demanding work, calibrate the sensor on a deadweight tester to ensure proper operation and calibration.
  5. Enter the calibration coefficients for the new sensor in:
  • the CTD configuration (.con or .xmlcon) file, using Seasave V7 or SBE Data Processing, and
  • (for an instrument with internally stored calibration coefficients) the CTD EEPROM, using the appropriate terminal program and the appropriate calibration coefficient commands

Note: This discussion does not apply to the SBE 25 (not 25plus), which uses a modular pressure sensor (SBE 29) mounted externally on the CTD. Swap the SBE 29 as desired, use the CC command in Seaterm or SeatermAF to enter the new pressure range and pressure temperature compensation value, and type the calibration coefficients for the new sensor into the CTD configuration (.con or .xmlcon) file in Seasave V7 or SBE Data Processing.

Can I brush-clean and replatinize the conductivity cell myself? How often should this be done?

Brush-cleaning and replatinizing should be performed at Sea-Bird. We cannot extend warranty coverage if you perform this work yourself.

The brush-cleaning and replatinizing process requires specialized equipment and chemicals, and the disassembly of the sensor. If performed incorrectly, you can damage the cell. Additionally, the sensor must be re-calibrated when the work is complete.

Sea-Bird determines whether brush-cleaning and replatinizing is required based upon how far the calibration has drifted from the original calibration. Typically, a conductivity sensor on a profiling CTD requires brush-cleaning and replatinizing every 5 years.

I sent my conductivity sensor to Sea-Bird for calibration, and you also performed a Cleaning and Replatinizing (C &P). You sent the instrument back with 2 sets of calibration data. What does this mean?

The post-cruise calibration contains important information for drift calculations. The post-cruise calibration is performed on the cell as we received it from you, and is an indicator of how much the sensor has drifted in the field. Information from the post-cruise calibration can be used to adjust your data, based on the sensor’s drift over time. See Application Note 31: Computing Temperature and Conductivity Slope and Offset Correction Coefficients from Laboratory Calibrations and Salinity Bottle Samples.

If the sensor has drifted significantly (based on the data from the post-cruise calibration), Sea-Bird performs a C & P to restore the cell to a state similar to the original calibration. After the C & P, the sensor is calibrated again. This calibration serves as the starting point for future data, and for the sensor’s next drift calculation.

The C & P tends to return the cell to its original state. However, there are many subtle factors that may result in the post-C & P calibration not exactly matching the original calibration. Basically, the old platinizing is stripped off and new platinizing is plated on. Anything in this process that alters the cell slightly will result in a difference from the original calibration. We compare the calibration after C & P with the original calibration, not to make any drift analysis, but to make sure we did not drastically alter the cell, or that the cell was not damaged during the C & P process.

How can I tell if the conductivity cell on my CTD is broken?

Conductivity cells are made of glass, which is breakable.

  • If a cell is cracked, it typically causes a salinity shift or erratic data.
  • However, if the crack occurs at the end of the cell, the sensor will continue to function normally until water penetrates the epoxy jacket. Post-cruise calibration results will reveal whether or not water has penetrated the epoxy jacket.

Inspect the cell thoroughly and make sure that it isn’t cracked or abused in any way.

  • (SBE 9plus, 25, or 25plus) If the readings are good at the surface but erratic at depth, it is likely that the problem is in the cable or the connector, not the conductivity cell. Check the connections, making sure that you burp the connectors when you plug them in (see Application Note 57: Connector Care and Cable Installation). Check the cable itself (swap with a spare cable, if available).
  • If the readings are incorrect at the surface but good after a few meters, it is likely that the problem is flow-related. Verify that the pump is working properly. Check the air bleed valve (the white plastic piece in the Y-fitting, which is installed on vertically deployed CTDs) to see if it is clogged; clean out the small hole with a piece of fine wire supplied with your CTD.
  • If the readings are incorrect for the entire cast, there may be an incorrect calibration coefficient or the cell may be cracked.
  • Check the conductivity calibration coefficients in the configuration (.con or .xmlcon) file.
  • Do a frequency check on the conductivity cell. Disconnect the plumbing on the cell. Rinse the cell with distilled or de-ionized water and blow it dry (use your mouth and not compressed air, as there tends to be oil in the air lines on ships). With the cell completely dry, check the frequency reading. It should read within a few tenths of a Hz of the 0 reading on your Calibration Sheet. If it does not, something is wrong with the cell and it needs to be repaired.

Should I purchase spare sensors for my SBE 9plus or 25plus?

Most customers purchase spare conductivity and temperature sensors. These sensors are exposed to ocean conditions and therefore more likely to be broken than an internal sensor. It is also very easy to change them because they are independent sensors that plug into the CTD main housing.

Most customers do not purchase spare pressure sensors for the following reasons:

  • The pressure sensor is inside the CTD main housing. It is very well protected against damage of any kind, and reliability of this sensor is extremely good.
  • The sensor is expensive.
  • It is difficult to change the sensor in the field.

What do I need to send to Sea-Bird for calibration of my SBE 9plus, 25, or 25plus?

For calibration of the temperature and conductivity sensors, only the sensor modules need to be sent to Sea-Bird. It is not necessary to send the CTD main housing. See Shipping SBE 9plus, 25, and 25plus Temperature and Conductivity Sensors for details.

It is usually not necessary to recalibrate the pressure sensor as frequently as the temperature and conductivity sensors. Experience has shown that the sensor’s sensitivity function almost never changes; only the offset drifts. The offset drift can easily be measured by reading deck pressure against a barometer. This small drift is easily corrected (Seasave V7 and SBE Data Processing provide an entry for the offset drift in the instrument .con or .xmlcon file).

  • SBE 9plus and 25plus — If the pressure sensor does need to be calibrated, the entire CTD must be shipped to Sea-Bird.
  • SBE 25 — If the pressure sensor does need to be calibrated, only the modular SBE 29 pressure sensor needs to be sent to Sea-Bird. It is not necessary to send the CTD main housing.

What are the major steps involved in taking a cast with a Profiling CTD?

Following is a brief outline of the major steps involved in taking a CTD cast, based on generally accepted practices. However, each ship, crew, and resident technicians have their own operating procedures. Each scientific group has their own goals. Therefore, observe local ship and scientific procedures, particularly in areas of safety. Before the cruise a discussion of the planned work is advisable between the ship’s crew, resident technicians, and scientific party. At this time discuss and clarify any specific ship’s procedures.

Note: The following procedure was written for an SBE 9plus CTD operating with an SBE 11plus Deck Unit. Modify the procedure as necessary for your CTD.

10 to 15 minutes before Station:

  1. Review the next cast’s plan, including proposed maximum cast depth, bottom depth, and number of bottles to close and depths. If the cast will be close to the bottom, familiarize yourself with the bottom topography.
  2. Verify that all water samples have been obtained from the bottles from the previous cast. If so, drain the bottles and cock them. Hand manipulate each Carousel latch as you cock the bottle to ensure it is free to release and is not stuck in some way.
  3. Remove the soaker tubes from the conductivity cells.
  4. Remove any other sensor covers.
  5. With permission from the deck crew, power up the CTD. Check the Deck Unit front panel display to verify communication. Perform a quick frequency check of the main sensors.
  6. Start Seasave. Set up a fixed display. Select Do not archive data for this cast. Start acquisition and view the data to verify the system is operational.
  7. Clean optical sensor windows, and perform any required air calibration.
  8. Stop acquisition. Do Not turn the CTD Deck Unit off. Select begin archiving data immediately. Set up the plot scales and status line.

5 minutes before Station:

  1. Start the ship's depth sounder and obtain a good depth reading. Be careful reading the depth sounder; if it is improperly configured the trace will wrap around the plot and be incorrect. The bottom depth should be close to the expected charted depth.
  2. Fill out any parts of the cast log that can be done at this time.

On Station, On Deck:

  1. Verify the position and the bottom depth.
  2. The computer operator should begin filling out the software header.
  3. After receiving word from the bridge that they are on station and ready to begin, untie the CTD and move it into position. If this requires hydraulics, ensure you have the appropriate people in place and permission.
  4. Position the CTD under the block. Have the winchman remove any slack from the wire.
  5. Notify the computer room that the CTD is ready for launch. The computer room should start acquiring data.
  6. Obtain a barometric pressure reading and note it on the cast sheet.
  7. When the bridge, computer room, and winchman are ready (and you have permission to proceed), put the CTD in the water.
  8. Have the winchman lower the CTD to 10 meters (his readout), hold for 1 minute, and then bring it back to the surface. One operator should remain on deck to help the winchman see when to stop the CTD. The CTD should be far enough below the surface so that the package does not break the surface in the swells.

CTD Soaking at the Surface:

  1. Finish filling out the cast log. Re-check the bottom depth.
  2. Fill out the computer software log.
  3. Hold the CTD at the surface for at least 3 minutes.
  4. Check the status line to verify that the CTD values are correct. The pressure should be the soaking depth of the CTD. Comparing the CTD temperature and salinity to the ship's thermosalinograph is helpful. Log the information (CTD and thermosalinograph) on the cast sheet.

Starting the Cast:

  1. Call the winchman and have him start the cast down. Typical lowering speed is 1 m/sec, modified for conditions as needed.
  2. Watch the computer output and verify that the system is working.

During the Cast:

  1. Closely monitor the CTD output for malfunctions. Sudden noise in a channel is often a sign of a leaking cable. A periodically flashing error light on the Deck Unit is a sign of a bad spot in the slip rings. The modulo error count (usually on the status line) provides an indication of telemetry integrity; on a properly functioning system, there will be no modulo errors.
  2. Note any odd behavior or problems on the cast sheet. Keeping good notes and records is of critical importance. While you may remember what happened an hour from now, in the months that follow, these notes will be a vital link to the cruise as you process the data.
  3. Monitor the bottom depth. This is especially critical if the cast will be close to the bottom, or you are working in an area with varying topography such as in a canyon. Running the CTD into the bottom can cause serious (and expensive) damage.

Approaching the Bottom:

  1. Take extra care if the cast will take the CTD close to the bottom. Monitor the bottom depth, pinger, and altimeter, if available. As you get within 30 meters of the bottom, slow down the cast to 0.5 m/sec. If you wish to get closer than 10 m above the bottom, slow down to 0.2 m/sec. Keep in mind that ship roll will cause the CTD depth to oscillate by several meters.
    - If the CTD does touch bottom, it will be apparent from the sudden, low salinity spike. A transmissometer, if installed, will also show a sudden low spike.
  2. Adjust these numbers and procedures as conditions dictate to avoid crashing the CTD into the bottom.
  3. When the CTD reaches the maximum cast depth, call the winchman and stop the descent.
  4. Log a position on the cast sheet. If a bottle will be closed at the bottom, allow the CTD to soak for at least 1 minute (preferably several minutes) and then close the bottle. Verify that the software records the bottle closure confirmation.
  5. Start the CTD upcast. Stop the CTD ascent at any other bottle closure depths. For each bottle, soak for at least 1 minute (preferably several minutes) and then close the bottle.

End of the Cast:

  1. As the CTD approaches the surface, have someone help spot for the winchman. Stop the CTD below the surface. Close a bottle if desired.
  2. When ready, recover the CTD. Avoid banging the system against the ship.

CTD Back on Board:

  1. Stop data acquisition and power off the CTD.
  2. Move the CTD it into its holding area and secure it.
  3. See Application Note 2D: Instructions for Care and Cleaning of Conductivity Cells for details on rinsing, cleaning, and storing the conductivity cell. Fill the conductivity cell with clean DI (or 1% Triton-X) and secure the filler device to the CTD frame. Freezing water in a conductivity cell will break the cell.
  4. See Application Note 64: SBE 43 Dissolved Oxygen Sensor - Background Information, Deployment Recommendations, and Cleaning and Storage for details on rinsing, cleaning, and storing SBE 43 (membrane-type) dissolved oxygen sensors; see the SBE 63 manual for details on rinsing, cleaning, and storing SBE 63 optical dissolved oxygen sensors.
  5. Rinse any optical sensors.
  6. Rinse the water sampler latches with clean water.
  7. Draw water samples from the bottles.

After the Cast:

  1. Re-plot the data and look at any channels that were not displayed in real time.
  2. Perform diagnostics and take a first pass through processing.
    - Verify that the data is good (at least on a first-order basis) at this point, when you can still re-do the cast. Many casts are lost because they are not analyzed until months later, when the problems are discovered.
  3. Final processing may need to wait until bottle salts and post-cruise lab calibrations are available.

How should I handle my CTD to avoid cracking the conductivity cell?

Shipping: Sea-Bird carefully packs the CTD in foam for shipping. If you are shipping the CTD or conductivity sensor, carefully pack the instrument using the original crate and packing materials, or suitable substitutes.

Use: Cracks at the C-Duct end of the conductivity cell are most often caused by:

  • Hitting the bottom, which can cause the T-C Duct to flex, resulting in cracking at the end of the cell.
  • Removing the soaker tube from the T-C duct in a rough manner, which also causes the T-C Duct to flex. Pulling the soaker tube off at an angle can be especially damaging over time to the cell. Pull the soaker tube off straight down and gently.
  • Improper disassembly of the T-C ducted temperature and conductivity sensors (SBE 25, 25plus, and 9plus) when removing them for shipment to Sea-Bird for calibration. See Shipping SBE 9plus, 25, and 25plus Temperature and Conductivity Sensors for the correct procedure.

Note: If a Tygon tube attached to the conductivity cell has dried out, yellowed, or become difficult to remove, slice (with a razor knife or blade) and peel the tube off of the conductivity cell rather than twisting or pulling the tube off.

Should I collect water samples (close bottles) on the downcast or the upcast?

Most of our CTD manuals refer to using downcast CTD data to characterize the profile. For typical configurations, downcast CTD data is preferable, because the CTD is oriented so that the intake is seeing new water before the rest of the package causes any mixing or has an effect on water temperature.

However, if you take water samples on the downcast, the pressure on an already closed bottle increases as you continue through the downcast; if there is a small leak, outside water is forced into the bottle, contaminating the sample with deeper water. Conversely, if you take water samples on the upcast, the pressure decreases on an already closed bottle as you bring the package up; any leaking results in water exiting the bottle, leaving the integrity of the sample intact. Therefore, standard practice is to monitor real-time downcast data to determine where to take water samples (locations with well-mixed water and/or with peaks in the parameters of interest), and then take water samples on upcast.

Why and how should I align data from a 911plus CTD?

The T-C Duct on a 911plus imposes a fixed delay (lag time) between the temperature measurement and the conductivity measurement reported in a given data scan. The delay is due to the time it takes for water to transit from the thermistor to the conductivity cell, and is determined by flow rate (pump rate). The average flow rate for a 9plus is about 30 ml/sec. The Deck Unit (11plus) automatically advances conductivity (moves it forward in time relative to temperature) on the fly by a user-programmable amount (default value of 0.073 seconds), before the data is logged on your computer. This default value is about right for a typical 9plus flow rate. Any fine-tuning adjustments to this advance are determined by looking for salinity spikes corresponding to sharp temperature steps in the profile and, via the SBE Data Processing module Align CTD, trying different additions (+ or -) to the 0.073 seconds applied by the Deck Unit, until the spikes are minimized. Having found this optimum advance for your CTD (corresponding to its particular flow rate), you can use that value for all future casts (change the value in the Deck Unit) unless the CTD plumbing (hence flow rate) is changed.

Oxygen and other parameters from pumped sensors in the same flow as the CT sensors can also be re-aligned in time relative to temperature, to account for the transit time of water through the plumbing. A typical plumbing delay for the SBE 43 DO Sensor is 2 seconds. However, the DO sensor time constant varies from approximately 2 seconds at 25 °C to 5 seconds at 0 °C. So, you should add some advance time for this as well (total delay = plumbing delay + response time). As for the conductivity alignment, the Deck Unit can automatically advance oxygen on the fly by a user-programmable amount (default value of 0 seconds) before the data is logged on your computer. However, because there is more variability in the advance, most users choose to do the advance in post-processing, via the SBE Data Processing module Align CTD. For additional information and discussion, refer to Module 9 of our training class and the SBE Data Processing manual.

Note: Alignment values are actually entered in the 11plus Deck Unit and in SBE Data Processing relative to the pressure measurement. For the 9plus, it is sufficiently correct to assume that the temperature measurement is made at the same instant in time and space as the pressure measurement.

Can I deploy my profiling CTD for monitoring an oil spill?

Sea-Bird CTDs can be deployed in oil; the oil will not cause long-term damage to the CTD. If the oil coats the inside of the conductivity cell and coats the dissolved oxygen sensor membrane, it can possibly affect the sensor’s calibration (and thus affect the measurement and the data). Simple measures can reduce the impact, as follows:

  1. To minimize the ingestion of oil into the conductivity cell and onto the DO sensor membrane:

SBE 19, 19plus, 19plus V2, 25, or 25plus CTD:

Set up the CTD so that the pump does not turn on until the CTD is in the water and below the layer of surface oil, minimizing ingestion of oil (however, some oil will still enter the system). Pump turn-on is controlled by two user-programmable parameters: the minimum conductivity frequency and the pump delay.

Set the minimum conductivity frequency for pump turn-on above the instrument’s zero conductivity raw frequency (shown on the conductivity sensor Calibration Sheet), to prevent the pump from turning on when the CTD is in air. Note that this is the same as our typical recommendation for setting the minimum conductivity frequency.
     For salt water and estuarine applications - typical value = zero conductivity raw frequency + 500 Hz
     For fresh/nearly fresh water - typical value = zero conductivity raw frequency + 5 Hz
If the minimum conductivity frequency is too close to the zero conductivity raw frequency, the pump may turn on when the CTD is in air as result of small drifts in the electronics. Another option is to rely only on the pump turn-on delay time to control the pump; if so, set a minimum conductivity frequency lower than the zero conductivity raw frequency.

Set the pump turn-on delay time to allow enough time for you to lower the CTD below the surface oil layer after the CTD is in the water (the CTD starts counting the pump delay time after the minimum conductivity frequency is exceeded). You may need to set the pump delay time to be longer than our typical 30-60 second recommendation.

The current minimum conductivity frequency and pump delay can be checked by sending the status command to the CTD (DS or GetCD, as applicable). Commands for modifying these parameters are:

  • SBE 19: SP (SBE 19 responds with prompts for setting up these parameters)
  • SBE 19plus and 19plus V2: MinCondFreq=x and PumpDelay=x (where x is the value you are programming).
  • SBE 25: CC (SBE 25 responds with a series of setup prompts, including setting up these parameters)
  • SBE 25plus: SetMinCondFreq=x and SetPumpDelay=x (where x is the value you are programming).

SBE 9plus CTD:

Minimum conductivity frequency and pump delay are not user-programmable for the 9plus. 

If you are using your 9plus with the 11plus Deck Unit, the Deck Unit provides power to the 9plus. Without power, the pump will not turn on. At the start of the deployment, to ensure that you have cleared the surface oil layer before the pump turns on, do not turn on the Deck Unit until the 9plus is below the surface oil layer. Similarly, on the upcast, turn off the Deck Unit before the 9plus reaches the surface oil layer.

If your 9plus is equipped with the optional manual pump control, you can enable manual pump control via the Pump Control tab in Seasave V7’s Configure Inputs dialog box. Once enabled, you can turn the pump on and off from Seasave V7’s Real-Time Control menu. Do not turn the pump on until the CTD is below the surface oil layer. On the upcast, turn the pump off before the CTD reaches the surface oil layer.

  1. To reduce the effect of the ingestion of oil into the conductivity cell and onto the DO sensor membrane or optical window:

After each recovery, rigorously follow the cleaning and storage procedures in the following application notes ‑

  • Application Note 2D: Instructions for Care and Cleaning of Conductivity Cells
  • Application Note 64: SBE 43 Dissolved Oxygen Sensor – Background Information, Deployment Recommendations, and Cleaning and Storage
  • SBE 63 Optical Dissolved Oxygen Sensor manual

Quick Reference Sheets for Oil Spill Deployment:

An SBE 911plus order requires ordering the SBE 9plus CTD underwater unit as well as the SBE 11plus Deck Unit, shown in separate sections below. Alternatively, if using the SBE 9plus autonomously, an SBE 11plus Deck Unit is not required; order the SBE 17plus instead.

Family Model . Housing Pressure Sensor/Range Connectors JT4 Connector End Cap Electronics Pump Control
9 P . 2 – 6800 m (aluminum) G - 2000 psia Digiquartz 1 – XSG/AG 0 – None 0 – Frequency
      3 – 10,500 m (titanium) H - 3000 psia Digiquartz 2 – MCBH 1 – GO 1015 1 – Manual
        I - 6000 psia Digiquartz   2 – Serial Data Uplink, sensor communication 9600 baud 2 – Water Contact
        J - 10,000 psia Digiquartz   3 – Serial Data Uplink, sensor communication 19200 baud  
        K - 15,000 psia Digiquartz   4 - Serial Output  

Example: 9P.2J200 is an SBE 9plus with 6800 m housing, 10,000 psia Digiquartz pressure sensor, MCBH connectors, no additional electronics for JT4 connector, and frequency pump control. See table below for description of each selection:

PART # DESCRIPTION NOTES
9plus UNDERWATER UNIT for 911plus CTD - 24 Hz sampling rate, includes modular Temperature & Conductivity sensors with TC Duct, SBE 5T submersible pump, redundant T & C input channels, 8 differential input, low pass-filtered A/D channels, water sampler modem channel, stainless steel guard cage, seacable pigtail, Seasoft software, & complete documentation.

SBE 9plus includes SBE 3plus temperature sensor, SBE 4C conductivity sensor, SBE 5T pump, & associated cabling, plumbing, & mounting.

Real-Time Data Operation:
9plus provides real-time data when controlled with 11plus Deck Unit (see below). Deck Unit provides power, decodes data stream, passes data to computer, & allows user control of water sampler.



Notes:

  • Computer, slip-ring-equipped winch, conductive cable, & NMEA 0183 navigation device not supplied by Sea-Bird.
  • See 9p-4b for G.O. 1015 water sampler control.
  • When used without water sampler, 9plus is deployed in vertical orientation.
  • Standard & optional auxiliary sensors on 9plus not shown.
  • Seasave also supports acquisition of data from a NMEA device connected directly to computer (instead of deck unit).
  • Serial Data Uplink (9600 Baud Uplink in diagram above) is supported by current version of standard 11plus V2 (which includes water sampler modem channel and serial data interface electronics). It also requires standard water sampler modem channel in 9plus as well as serial data uplink selection in 9plus.

Autonomous operation:
Autonomous operation (no conducting wire required) is provided when 9plus is controlled with 17plus V2 Searam Memory & Auto Fire Module. Searam provides power, stores data in memory, & allows operation of water sampler with pre-programmed closure pressures.

Notes:

  • Winch & cable not supplied by Sea-Bird.
  • When used without SBE 32 or 32C Carousel water sampler, 9plus is deployed in vertical orientation.
  • Standard & optional auxiliary sensors on 9plus not shown.
SBE 9plus Housing (Depth) Selections — MUST SELECT ONE
9P.2xxxx Aluminum housing, 6800 m depth rating 9plus is available for maximum depths of 6800 m (aluminum housing for main housing & T & C sensors) or 10,500 m (titanium housing for main housing & T & C sensors). SBE 5T pump is titanium, regardless of housing option, & is rated for 10,500 m.

 

9P.3xxxx Titanium housing, 10,500 m depth rating
SBE 9plus Pressure Sensor Range (Depth Limit) Selections — MUST SELECT ONE
9P.xGxxx 0 - 2000 psia (1400 m) pressure sensor Pressure sensor is installed in main housing bottom end cap. Unlike modular T & C sensors, pressure sensor is not field-replaceable / swappable. While highest pressure rating gives you most flexibility in using 9plus, it is at expense of accuracy & resolution. It is advantageous to use lowest range pressure sensor compatible with your intended maximum operating depth, because accuracy & resolution are proportional to pressure sensor's full scale range. For example, comparing 1400 & 4200 m sensors:
  • 1400 m sensor:
    initial accuracy = 0.21 m (= 0.015% * 1400 m),
    resolution = 0.014 m (= 0.001% * 1400 m)
  • 4200 m sensor:
    initial accuracy = 0.63 m (= 0.015% * 4200 m),
    resolution = 0.042 m (= 0.001% * 4200 m)
9P.xHxxx 0 - 3000 psia (2000 m) pressure sensor
9P.xIxxx 0 - 6000 psia (4200 m) pressure sensor
9P.xJxxx 0 - 10,000 psia (6800 m) pressure sensor
9P.xKxxx 0 - 15,000 psia (10,500 m) pressure sensor
SBE 9plus Connector Selections — MUST SELECT ONE
9P.xx1xx XSG/AG connectors on CTD, T&C sensors, pump, and related cables Wet-pluggable connectors may be mated in wet conditions. Their pins do not need to be dried before mating. By design, water on connector pins is forced out as connector is mated. However, they must not be mated or un-mated while submerged. Wet-pluggable connectors have a non-conducting guide pin to assist pin alignment & require less force to mate, making them easier to mate reliably under dark or cold conditions, compared to XSG/AG connectors. Like XSG/AG connectors, wet-pluggables need proper lubrication & require care during use to avoid trapping water in sockets.
  
Connector on SBE 3plus Temperature Sensor with aluminum housing shown,
to illustrate difference between XSG/AG & wet-pluggable connectors.
9P.xx2xx Wet-pluggable (MCBH) connectors on CTD, T&C sensors, pump, and related cables
SBE 9plus JT4 Connector End Cap Electronics Selections
9P.xxx0x No electronics installed for JT4 connector, 3-pin dummy connector installed 3-pin connector is installed for JT4, but not connected to any electronics.
9P.xxx1x Control module for GO 1015 water sampler, includes interface cables (requires water sampler modem)

300 baud modem for water sampler control (see note) is required to support GO 1015 water sampler. With this selection in 9plus, system provides real-time control for G.O. 1015 Rosette water sampler through 3-pin JT4 connector on 9plus top end cap.

*Note: 300 baud modem in 9plus & 11plus has been standard since 2005. For older instruments, it was optional.

9P.xxx2x Serial Data Uplink, 9600 unidirectional RS-232, with 9600 baud sensor communication interface (requires water sampler modem channel, limits cable length to 8,000 m, & makes 9plus incompatible with SBE 17plus Searam & other 911plus CTDs that do NOT have this option) 300 baud modem for water sampler control (see note) is required to support serial data uplink. Serial data is multiplexed into 9plus telemetry stream & de-multiplexed by 11plus, outputting to computer through standard 9600 Baud Uplink connector. System supports use of serial data output instrument & water sampler in same cast.

If 9P.xxx3x (19200 baud sensor communication) selected, continuous transmission rate may not exceed 9600 baud (960 bytes/second). Therefore, serial data output instrument must transmit at 19200 baud in burst mode (transmissions separated by intervals with no data transmission, resulting in average rate of 960 bytes/second).

When 9P.xxx2x or 9P.xxx3x is ordered, JT4 connector on 9plus top end cap is a 4-pin connector.

*Note: 300 baud modem in 9plus & 11plus has been standard since 2005. For older instruments, it was optional.

9P.xxx3x Serial Data Uplink, 9600 unidirectional RS-232, with 19200 baud sensor communication interface (requires water sampler modem channel, limits cable length to 8,000 m, & makes 9plus incompatible with SBE 17plus Searam & other 911plus CTDs that do NOT have this option)
9P.xxx4x RS-232 serial output interface, installed in place of 1015 interface. 9plus data output duplicates output from SBE 11plus deck unit, except that averaging and alignment must be done in post processing. This is a custom option for AUV integration applications. A PC running Seasave will be able to display and archive CTD data directly from 9plus – no deck unit required. This option is typically desired when an AUV / ROV is logging 9plus data. When this is ordered, 9plus transmits serial data through 3-pin JT4 connector on 9plus top end cap at 19,200 baud, 8 data bits, no parity. Power can also be supplied to 9plus through JT4 connector.
SBE 9plus Pump Control Selections
9P.xxxx0 Pump turn-on controlled by conductivity frequency (turns on 60 seconds after conductivity frequency exceeds hardwired value); may not be suitable for fresh water applications This selection is appropriate for most salt water applications.
9P.xxxx1 Manual pump control allows user to turn pump on and off by command from Seasave software; typically used for fresh water applications

These selections are typically used for fresh water applications:

  • Manual Pump Control - Pump control commands are sent via Seasave V7 through SBE 11plus Deck Unit's Modem Channel connector, but pump control does not interfere with water sampler operation. Manual pump control is enabled/disabled on Pump Control tab in Seasave V7's Configure Inputs dialog box. Pump is turned on and off from Seasave V7's Real-Time Control menu. Note that you must remember to turn pump on; it will not turn on automatically if this option is installed.
  • Water Contact Pump Control - Pump control is independent of water conductivity. Contact pin is on a special dummy plug that connects to JB6 on 9plus bottom end cap. Modifications to 9plus internal wiring to JB6 for this option prevent use of JB6 for a bottom contact switch. Note that you must inspect contact pin periodically for corrosion; corrosion may prevent pump from turning on.
9P.xxxx2 Water contact pump control connector allows pump to automatically turn on 60 seconds after contact pin is immersed in water (salt or fresh), and automatically turn off when contact pin is removed from water (prevents use of bottom contact switch); typically used for fresh water applications
SBE 9plus Secondary Temperature and Conductivity Sensor Options
9p-3a Secondary T & C sensors, aluminum housing, 6800 m, with TC Duct & Pump, XSG connectors (requires 9P.xx1xx) Secondary (redundant) T & C sensors can be used to verify data from primary T & C sensors, for applications requiring very high accuracy. Secondary sensors come complete with TC Duct & secondary pump (& all associated plumbing), & mount onto main housing bottom end cap like primary sensors. Secondary sensors are available for maximum depths of 6800 m (aluminum housing on T & C sensors) or 10,500 m (titanium housing on T & C sensors). 9plus is compatible with secondary T & C sensors; secondary sensors can be added to system in field without any modification to 9plus electronics.

Secondary sensor connector type (XSG/AG or wet-pluggable) must match 9plus connector type.

All 9p-3 options include SBE 3plus temperature sensor, SBE 4C conductivity sensor, SBE 5T pump, & associated cabling, plumbing, & mounting. Note that secondary pump is powered via same bulkhead connector as primary pump, via Y-cable included with all 9p-3 options (DN 31522 for standard connectors, DN 32673 for wet-pluggable connectors).

9p-3b Secondary T & C sensors, aluminum housing, 6800 m, with TC Duct & Pump, Wet-pluggable connectors (requires 9P.xx2xx)
9p-3c Secondary T & C sensors, titanium housing, 10,500 m, with TC Duct & Pump, XSG connectors (requires 9P.xx1xx)
9p-3d Secondary T & C sensors, titanium housing, 10,500 m, with TC Duct & Pump, Wet-pluggable connectors (requires 9P.xx2xx)
SBE 9plus Auxiliary Sensor Options
9p-6a SBE 43 Dissolved Oxygen sensor (Profiling Configuration), 7000 m (XSG/AG connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx1xx) General Information:
  • 9p-6, -7, & -8 include auxiliary sensor, mount, & straight cable to connect sensor to 9plus bulkhead connector. See auxiliary sensor specification sheets (SBE 43, 18, 27) for sensor descriptions. Auxiliary sensor connector type (XSG/AG or wet-pluggable) must match 9plus connector type.
  • SBE 9plus has 8 differential input A/D channels for auxiliary sensors. Each of 4 auxiliary sensor bulkhead connectors on 9plus end cap can obtain input from up to 2 sensors. If connecting 2 sensors to 1 bulkhead connector, YMOLD (to create a y-cable) applies in addition to 9p-6, -7, & -8 price.
  • Additional sensors not listed here — fluorometers, transmissometers, turbidity meters, PAR sensors, altimeters, etc. from third party manufacturers — are compatible with 9plus. These sensors can be purchased from Sea-Bird & integrated with 9plus at our factory, or you can purchase mount kits & cables from Sea-Bird & perform integration yourself. See Third Party portion of price list.
  • User can change sensors on 9plus in field. However, as noted above, Y-cable is required to connect 2 auxiliary sensors to 1 bulkhead connector on 9plus; each Y-cable is unique to sensors being integrated, so changing sensors may require changing Y-cable. In addition, sensor mechanical mountings may need to be changed to suit selected combination of sensors.

Sensor-Specific Information:

  • SBE 43 — SBE 43 is plumbed between conductivity sensor & pump. SBE 43 is available in 600 m plastic housing or 7000 m titanium housing.
  • SBE 18 & SBE 27 — These sensors are only available with a depth rating to 1200 m.
9p-6b SBE 43 Dissolved Oxygen sensor (Profiling Configuration), 7000 m (Wet-pluggable connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx2xx)
9p-6c SBE 43 Dissolved Oxygen sensor (Profiling Configuration), 600 m plastic housing (XSG/AG connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx1xx)
9p-6d SBE 43 Dissolved Oxygen sensor (Profiling Configuration), 600 m plastic housing (Wet-pluggable connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx2xx)
9p-7a SBE 18 pH sensor, 1200 m (XSG/AG connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx1xx)
9p-7b SBE 18 pH sensor, 1200 m (Wet-pluggable connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx2xx)
9p-8a SBE 27 pH/ORP sensor, 1200 m (XSG/AG connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx1xx)
9p-8a SBE 27 pH/ORP sensor, 1200 m (Wet-pluggable connectors). Cable & mount included. (requires 9P.xx2xx)
YMOLD Extra charge for Y-cable to connect two (2) or more sensors to one (1) auxiliary sensor input bulkhead connector on CTD
9p-9a Bottom Contact Switch module (XSG connector, cable & mount included) (requires 9P.xx1xx) Weight is attached with heavy line to switch. Switch closes when weight removed, setting bit in 9plus data stream. This causes alarm to turn on in 11plus Deck Unit, providing early warning that CTD is nearing ocean floor. Bottom contact switch does not use one of 8 A/D channels, so system can accommodate switch in addition to 8 auxiliary sensors.

Bottom contact switch connector type (XSG or wet-pluggable) must match 9plus connector type.

Note: Since 2007, Sea-Bird uses a female bulkhead connector on 9plus for bottom contact switch, in place of male bulkhead connector. This change was made to differentiate bottom contact switch connector from sea cable connector. See bottom end cap photo above & Application Note 86.
9p-9b Bottom Contact Switch module (Wet-pluggable connector, cable & mount included) (requires 9P.xx2xx)
9p-11b Serial Data Uplink, 9600 unidirectional RS-232, with 19200 baud sensor communication interface (requires water sampler modem channel, limits cable length to 8,000 m, prevents GO 1015 interface, & makes 9plus incompatible with SBE 17plus Searam & other 911plus CTDs that do NOT have this option) 300 baud modem for water sampler control (see note) is required to support serial data uplink. Serial data is multiplexed into 9plus telemetry stream & de-multiplexed by 11plus, outputting to computer through standard 9600 Baud Uplink connector. System supports use of serial data output instrument & water sampler in same cast.

If 9p-11b (19200 baud) selected, continuous transmission rate may not exceed 9600 baud (960 bytes/second). Therefore, serial data output instrument must transmit at 19200 baud in burst mode (transmissions separated by intervals with no data transmission, resulting in average rate of 960 bytes/second).

When 9p-11a or 11b is ordered, 3-pin JT4 connector for G.O. 1015 on 9plus top end cap is replaced with 4-pin serial data connector.

*Note: 300 baud modem in 9plus & 11plus has been standard since 2005. For older instruments, it was optional.

SBE 9plus Wide Range Calibration Options
9p-12a Wide Range Calibration - Primary T & C (+45 degrees C & 9 S/m) Standard calibration range goes up to +32.5 °C & 6 S/m; more than 99% of oceanographic work is below this temperature & conductivity. Our calibration equations & fits permit extrapolations significantly beyond this range with only minor loss of accuracy. Wide range calibration goes up to +45 °C (additional calibration points at 36, 40, & 45 °C) & 9 S/m. See Application Note 94: Wide-Range Conductivity Calibration.

Wide range calibrations require a 12-week lead time.

9p-12b Wide Range Calibration - Secondary T & C (requires option 9p-12a)
SBE 9plus Hardig Shipping Case Option
9p-13 Hardigg shipping case (AL4915-1105) instead of wood crate Hardigg shipping case with custom foam inserts holds SBE 9plus with auxiliary sensors in standard cage.
  • Rotationally molded high-impact polyethylene with reinforced corners & edges, molded-in corrugations, reinforced corners & edges, tongue-in-groove seal, positive anti-shear locks, comfort-grip handle, recessed hardware. Meets airline luggage regulations.
  • Inner dimensions:
    49 x 14.8 x 16.2 inches (124 x 38 x 41 cm).
  • Outer dimensions:
    52 x 17.8 x 18.4 inches (132 x 45 x 47 cm).
Price for 9p-13 reflects a credit for deletion of our standard wood crate.
Notes regarding features of Hardigg case supplied by Sea-Bird:
1. Case does not have wheels, because we prefer that the case is not rolled along the ground:
- Rolling along the ground could cause unnecessary vibration of the CTD.
- Rolling over a curb could cause unnecessary impact to the CTD.
2. Case has small holes on each metal latch, into which you could insert a small, TSA-approved lock or some zip ties. Case cannot accommodate a large padlock.
SBE 9plus Spares & Accessories
50088 Seaspares (for Aluminum housing with XSG/AG connectors), SBE 9Plus support kit containing spare sensor cables, connectors, hardware, o-rings, clamps, tubing, fittings, anodes, etc. Order appropriate Seaspares kit for housing type & connector type on 9plus:
  • 50088 for aluminum 9plus with XSG/AG connectors — See document 67025 for complete listing of parts.
  • 50139 for titanium 9plus with XSG/AG connectors — See document 67128 for complete listing of parts.
  • 50321 for aluminum 9plus with wet-pluggable connectors — See document 67129 for complete listing of parts.
  • 50322 for titanium 9plus with wet-pluggable connectors — See document 67130 for complete listing of parts.
50139 Seaspares (for Titanium housing with XSG/AG connectors), SBE 9Plus support kit containing spare sensor cables, connectors, hardware, O-rings, clamps, tubing, fittings, etc.
50321 Seaspares (for Aluminum housing with Wet-pluggable connectors), SBE 9Plus support kit containing spare sensor cables, connectors, hardware, O-rings, clamps, tubing, fittings, anodes, etc.
50322 Seaspares (for Titanium housing with Wet-pluggable connectors), SBE 9Plus support kit containing spare sensor cables, connectors, hardware, O-rings, clamps, tubing, fittings, etc.
17252 2-pin seacable extension, RMG connectors, 0.7 m (DN 30588) Female end connects to JT1 on 9plus top end cap (connector type must match 9plus); male end connects to sea cable. Many users leave extension connected to 9plus, & make connection to sea cable at end of extension (instead of at end cap, which is crowded with a number of connectors & may be difficult to access).
17120 2-pin seacable extension, RMG connectors, 2 m (DN 30588)
171090 2-pin seacable extension, RMG connectors, 3 m (DN 30588)
171743 2-pin seacable extension, Wet-pluggable connectors, 2 m (DN 32763)
171744 2-pin seacable extension, Wet-pluggable connectors, 3 m (DN 32763)
17198 Interface cable, 9plus to 32, AG connectors, 2 m (DN 30568) Connects 9plus to SBE 32 or 32C Carousel Water Sampler. Connector type (AG or wet-pluggable) must match 9plus & SBE 32 or 32C connector type. Note that interface cable & mounting hardware are included with Carousel if Carousel is ordered with CTD integration kit for 9plus.
171741 Interface cable, 9plus to 32, Wet-pluggable connectors, 2 m (DN 32758)
17086 SBE 3 (Temperature) or SBE 4 (Conductivity) interface cable, RMG connectors, 0.63 m (DN 30566) Spare cable to connect 9plus to SBE 3plus or 4C. Connector type (RMG or wet-pluggable) must match 9plus & SBE 3plus or 4C connector type.
171669 SBE 3 (Temperature) or SBE 4 (Conductivity) interface cable, Wet-pluggable connectors, 0.7 m (DN 32671)
17133 Pump cable, RMG-2FS to RMG-2FS, 1.1 m (DN 30565) Spare cable to connect 9plus to SBE 5T pump. Connector type (RMG or wet-pluggable) must match 9plus & SBE 5T connector type.
171503 Pump cable, Wet-pluggable connectors, MCIL-2FS to MCIL-2FS, 1.1 m (DN 32499)
41713 Sea cable interface assembly (replaces 80593) Spare PCBs for 9plus. Contact Sea-Bird with serial number of your 9plus to verify correct part number for PCB. (Click here to see an example of where to find the serial number on your instrument.)
41799 9plus Modem Card (replaces 801017)
40540 Control module for model 1015 water sampler (replaces 80585)
40968 Analog interface card (replaces 80589)
80581 Transmitter card
41613 Logic card (replaces 80621)
80935 Modulo 12P card (substitute for PN 80640)
80609 AP counter card
801042 9plus Control, store - A/D card (substitute for 80590)
50025 Pressure sensor oil refill kit (document 67066) Due to temperature and pressure cycling over long periods, it is normal for some oil to slowly leak out of pressure sensor external capillary tube. When oil is not visible or is receding inside translucent tube, or if fitting has been damaged, refill oil using this kit. See Application Note 12-1: Pressure Port Oil Refill Procedure & Nylon Capillary Fitting Replacement.
50087 Cell filler/storage device (Application Note 34) For cleaning conductivity cell after each use & storing instrument between uses. See document 67043 & Application Note 2D: Instructions for Care and Cleaning of Conductivity Cells.
various Plumbing spares For air bleed valve & y-fitting, snap-on connector, & assorted sizes of Tygon tubing, see SBE 5T Configuration.
801283 SBE 9plus stainless steel protective cage (includes PN 23559C, mounting hardware, etc.) Spare cage (cage DN 20287).
31634 Hardigg shipping case (AL4915-1105) Hardigg shipping case with custom foam inserts holds SBE 9plus with auxiliary sensors in standard cage.
  • Rotationally molded high-impact polyethylene with reinforced corners & edges, molded-in corrugations, reinforced corners & edges, tongue-in-groove seal, positive anti-shear locks, comfort-grip handle, recessed hardware. Meets airline luggage regulations.
  • Inner dimensions:
    49 x 14.8 x 16.2 inches (124 x 38 x 41 cm).
  • Outer dimensions:
    52 x 17.8 x 18.4 inches (132 x 45 x 47 cm).
Notes regarding features of Hardigg case supplied by Sea-Bird:
1. Case does not have wheels, because we prefer that the case is not rolled along the ground:
- Rolling along the ground could cause unnecessary vibration of the CTD.
- Rolling over a curb could cause unnecessary impact to the CTD.
2. Case has small holes on each metal latch, into which you could insert a small, TSA-approved lock or some zip ties. Case cannot accommodate a large padlock.

 

 

Family Model . Power CTD Connector (for test cable)
11 P . 1 – 120 VAC 1 – XSG
      2 - 240 VAC 2 – MCBH
      3 - EU 240 VAC  

Example: 11P.12 is an SBE 11plus V2 with 120 VAC power input and test cable for CTD with MCBH. See table below for description of each selection:

PART # DESCRIPTION NOTES
11plus V2 DECK UNIT for 911plus CTD - (Version 2) includes IEEE-488 and RS-232 interfaces, water sampler modem channel, NMEA 0183 GPS interface, A/D input channel for Surface PAR reference sensor, ASCII serial data output port, CTD pressure signal output, audible bottom contact alarm, audio tape interface, 120/240 VAC (switchable) input power, AC power cord, 10 m CTD test cable, NMEA test cable, remote output cable, serial data cable, rack mount kit, Seasoft software, and complete documentation.

9plus provides real-time data when controlled with 11plus V2 Deck Unit. 11plus V2 provides power, decodes data stream, passes data to computer, & allows user control of water sampler.



Notes:

  • Computer, slip-ring-equipped winch, conductive cable, & NMEA 0183 navigation device not supplied by Sea-Bird.
  • When used without water sampler, 9plus is deployed in vertical orientation.
  • Standard & optional auxiliary sensors on 9plus not shown.
  • Version of 11plus in current production is referred to as 11plus V2.
  • Seasave also supports acquisition of data from a NMEA device connected directly to computer (instead of deck unit).
  • Serial Data Uplink (9600 Baud Uplink in diagram above) is supported by current version of standard 11plus V2 (which includes water sampler modem channel and serial data interface electronics). It also requires standard water sampler modem channel in 9plus as well as serial data uplink selection in 9plus.
SBE 11plus Power Selections — MUST SELECT ONE
11P.1x 120 VAC  
11P.2x 240 VAC  
11P.3x EU 240 VAC  
SBE 11plus CTD Connector (for test cable) Selections — MUST SELECT ONE
11P.x1 For SBE 9plus with XSG/AG connectors This defines the connector on the CTD end of the test cable.
11P.x2 For SBE 9plus with MCBH connectors
SBE 11plus Spares & Accessories

11plus V2 Back Panel; many of remaining parts relate to connections to back panel
31043 Hardigg Case, AL-2221-0604, White, air tight, breather valve, SS hardware Hardigg shipping case holds SBE 11plus.
17556 Deck Unit signal input cable (from slip rings to Deck Unit), 10 m (DN 31371) Pigtail connects Sea Cable on 11plus V2 to slip rings.
17557 Deck Unit signal input cable (from slip rings to Deck Unit), 20 m (DN 31371)
17841 Deck Unit signal input cable (from slip rings to Deck Unit), 30 m (DN 31371)
17912 Deck Unit signal input cable (from slip rings to Deck Unit), 50 m (DN 31371)
50086 2-pin connector, deck unit seacable input Connects to Sea Cable on 11plus V2. Included with standard shipment; this is spare.
80915 Test cable, 11/33/36 deck unit to 9/32/PDIM, RMG connector, 10 m (DN 31314) Connects Sea Cable on 11plus V2 to 9plus CTD for testing. Included with standard shipment; these are spares:
  • 80915 for XSG connector on 9plus
  • 801587 for Wet-pluggable connector on 9plus
801587 Test cable, 11/33/36 Deck Unit to 9/32/PDIM, Wet-pluggable connector, 10 m (DN 32695)
801422 NMEA Test Cable, DB-9S to MS3106A, SBE 11p/33/36/45, 1.8 m (DN 32786) Connects NMEA Input on 11plus V2 to computer simulating NMEA input for testing 11plus V2 NMEA interface. Included with standard shipment; this is spare.
NMEA simulation program, NMEATest, is part of Seasoft software, & is installed when you install SBE Data Processing.
801429 Remote Data Output Test Cable, DB-9S to MS3106A, 1.8 m (DN 32799) Connects Remote Out on 11plus V2 to computer to set up Remote Output interface. Cable is included with standard shipment; this is spare.
171887 RS-232 serial cable, DB-9F to DB-9M, 3 m (171887) Connects SBE 11 Interface (RS-232) or Modem Channel on 11plus V2 to computer COM ports. Two cables included with standard shipment; this is spare.
801367 Cable, QSR/QCR-2200 SPAR to Deck Unit, 15 m (DN 32704) Connects Surface PAR Input on 11plus V2 to Surface PAR sensor.
801368 Cable, QSR/QCR-2200 SPAR to Deck Unit, 30 m (DN 32704)
171890 RS-232 serial data uplink cable, DB-9P to DB-9S, 3 m Null modem cable connects computer to Serial Data Uplink on 11plus V2 back panel. See 171890 for pinouts.

300 baud modem for water sampler control (see note below) & Serial Data Uplink selection in 9plus is required to support serial data uplink. Serial data is multiplexed into 9plus telemetry stream & de-multiplexed by 11plus V2, outputting to computer through standard 9600 Baud Uplink connector. System supports use of serial data output instrument & water sampler in same cast.

If 19200 baud serial data uplink selected, continuous transmission rate may not exceed 9600 baud (960 bytes/second). Therefore, serial data output instrument must transmit at 19200 baud in burst mode (transmissions separated by intervals with no data transmission, resulting in average rate of 960 bytes/second).

*Note: 300 baud modem in 9plus & 11plus has been standard since 2005. For older instruments, it was optional.
17015 AC power cord (US Standard), 2 m One of these (as applicable) as included with standard shipment; this is spare.
17824 AC power cord, European plug, 2 m
30017 SBE 11plus rack mounting kit (spare) For mounting 11plus V2 in standard rack. Included with standard shipment; this is spare. See document 67059.
80673 11plus modem board  
40934C Receiver Board  
40937C Digital Board  
20033 Mallory SC628MN alarm buzzer Alarm sounds based on data from bottom contact switch &/or altimeter connected to 9plus, &/or minimum/maximum user-input pressure values.
22002 Primary power supply (Power One HTAA-16W-A)  
80811 NMEA interface board (V1 deck units only)  
80040 LED display board 11plus V2 front panel provides numeric display of frequency & voltage data via thumbwheel switch & 8-digit LED readout.
20018 Cooling Fan  
80586 11plus sea cable power supply  
19006 Thumbwheel switch 11plus V2 front panel provides numeric display of frequency & voltage data via thumbwheel switch & 8-digit LED readout.

 

Cables

SBE 9plus —

  • pigtail to seacable, part # varies depending on length (RMG connector), DN 30579
  • pigtail to seacable, part # varies depending on length (Wet-pluggable connector), DN 32514
  • seacable extension, part # varies depending on length (RMG connectors), DN 30588
  • seacable extension, part # varies depending on length (Wet-pluggable connectors), DN 32763
  • 17086 To SBE 3 or SBE 4 (RMG connectors), 0.64 m, DN 30566
  • 171669 To SBE 3 or SBE 4 (Wet-pluggable connectors), 0.76 m, DN 32671
  • 17133 To SBE 5T (RMG connectors), 1.12 m, DN 30565
  • 171503 To SBE 5T (Wet-pluggable connectors), 1.12 m, DN 32499
  • 17799 To SBE 5T (y-cable for dual pumps, RMG connectors), DN 31522
  • 171671 To SBE 5T (y-cable for dual pumps, Wet-pluggable connectors), DN 32673
  • 80591 To SBE 11plus (from XSG connector), 2.4 m, DN 31314
  • 80915 To SBE 11plus (from XSG connector), 10 m, DN 31314
  • 801363 To SBE 11plus (from Wet-pluggable connector), 2.4 m, DN 32695
  • 17546 To SBE 13 (RMG/AG connectors), 1.27 m, DN 31331
  • 17132 To SBE 17plus (AG connectors), 0.33 m, DN 30568
  • 171796 To SBE 17plus (Wet-pluggable connectors), 0.33 m, DN 32758
  • 17474 To SBE 18 (RMG/AG connectors), 0.76 m, DN 30918
  • 171827 To SBE 18 (Wet-pluggable connectors), 0.76 m, DN 32845
  • 17898 To SBE 27 (AG connectors), 0.76 m, DN 31749
  • 171825 To SBE 27 (Wet-pluggable connectors), 0.76 m, DN
  • 17198 To SBE 32 (AG connectors), 2 m, DN 30568
  • 171741 To SBE 32 (Wet-pluggable connectors), 2 m, DN 32758
  • 171220 Y-cable (SBE 9plus/35 or 35RT/32) (AG connectors), DN 32208
  • 171995 Y-cable (SBE 9plus/35 or 35RT/32), (Wet-pluggable connectors),  DN 32963
  • 171491 To SBE 43 (RMG/AG connectors), 0.76 m, DN 32496
  • 172218 To SBE 43 (Wet-pluggable connectors), 0.76 m, DN 32654
  • 17133 To Bottom Contact Switch (RMG connectors, male bulkhead connector on 9plus), 1.12 m, DN 30565
  • 172267 To Bottom Contact Switch (RMG/VMG connectors, female bulkhead connector on 9plus), 1.12 m, DN 33200
  • 172270 To Bottom Contact Switch (Wet-pluggable connectors, female bulkhead connector on 9plus), 1.12 m, DN 33201
  • 171130 To Benthos/Datasonics PSA-916 (from  AG connector), 1.8 m, DN 32075
  • 17437 To Benthos/Datasonics PSA-900 (from AG connector), 1.8 m, DN 30864
  • 17610 To Biospherical QSP-200L or QSP-2300L (fromAG connector), 2 m, DN 30701
  • 17602 To Chelsea AquaTracka or AlphaTracka (from AG connector), 1.2 m, DN 31253
  • 17361 To D&A OBS-3 (from AG connector), 0.76 m, DN 30954
  • 172130 To D&A OBS-3+ (from AG connector), High & Low range, 1 m, DN 33080
  • 172131 To D&A OBS-3+ (from Wet-pluggable connector), High & Low range, 1 m, DN 33081
  • 172109 To D&A OBS-3+ (from AG connector), Low range (1X), 1 m, DN 33058
  • 172111 To D&A OBS-3+ (from Wet-pluggable connector), Low range (1X), 1 m, DN 33060
  • 172110 To D&A OBS-3+ (from AG connector), High range (4X), 1 m, DN 33059
  • 172112 To D&A OBS-3+ (from Wet-pluggable connector), High range (4X), 1 m, DN 33061
  • 17196 (reverse polarity) To G.O. 1015 Rosette (from 9plus XSG connector), 2.5 m, DN 30566
  • 17533 (normal polarity) To G.O. 1015 Rosette (from 9plus XSG connector), 2.4 m, DN 31315
  • 172215 To Satlantic SatPAR (from AG connector), 2 m, DN 32628
  • 172214 To Satlantic SatPAR (from Wet-pluggable connector), 2 m, DN 32654
  • 171099 To Seapoint fluorometer or turbidity meter (1X) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32073
  • 171147 To Seapoint fluorometer or turbidity meter (3X/5X) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32101
  • 172221 To Seapoint fluorometer or turbidity meter (10X/20X) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 31933
  • 171845 To Seapoint fluorometer or turbidity meter (30X/100X) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 31924
  • 171908 To Turner Cyclops-7 (1X) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32910
  • 171907 To Turner Cyclops-7 (10X) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32909
  • 171909 To Turner Cyclops-7 (100X) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32911
  • 171418 To Turner SCUFA (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32417
  • 17876 To WET Labs C-Star or WETStar with old-style 4-pin connector (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 31725
  • 171953 To WET Labs ECO-AFL, ECO-FL, C-Star, or WETStar with new-style 6-pin connector (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32491
  • 172437 To WET Labs ECO-AFL, ECO-FL, C-Star, or WETStar with new-style 6-pin connector (from Wet-pluggable connector), 1.1 m, DN 32853
  • 171869 To WET Labs ECO-FL-NTUS or ECO-FL-NTU(RT) (from AG connector), 1.1 m, DN 32812
  • 172285 To WET Labs ECO-FL-NTUS or ECO-FL-NTU(RT) (from 9plus Wet-pluggable connector), 1.1 m, DN 32846

SBE 11plus —

  • To slip ring (from SBE 11 Sea Cable), part # varies depending on length, DN 31371
  • 80591 To SBE 9plus (with XSG connector) (test cable) (from SBE 11 Sea Cable), 2.4 m, DN 31314
  • 80915 To SBE 9plus (with XSG connector) (test cable) (from SBE 11 Sea Cable), 10 m, DN 31314
  • 801363 To SBE 9plus (with Wet-pluggable connector) (test cable) (from SBE 11 Sea Cable), 2.4 m, DN 32695
  • 171886 To computer COM port (from SBE 11 Interface [RS-232] or SBE 11 Modem Channel), 3 m — for older 25-pin connector on SBE 11plus V2
  • 171887 To computer COM port (from SBE 11 Interface [RS-232] or SBE 11 Modem Channel), 3 m — for current 9-pin connector on SBE 11plus V2
  • 17082 To computer COM port (from SBE 11 Interface [IEEE-488]) — for older 25-pin connector on SBE 11plus V2
  • 801422 To NMEA simulation computer COM port (from SBE 11 NMEA Input), 1.8 m, DN 32786
  • 801429 To computer COM port (from SBE 11 Remote Out, for setup), 1.8 m, DN 32799
  • 801367 To Surface PAR QSR-2200 or QCR-2200 with Switchcraft connector (from SBE 11 Surface PAR Input), 15 m, DN 32704
  • 80665 To Surface PAR QSR-240 or QCR-240 with Bendix connector (from SBE 11 Surface PAR Input), 30 m, DN 31475
  • 801238 To Surface PAR QSR-240 or -2200 or QCR-240 or -2200 with Lemo connector (from SBE 11 Surface PAR Input), 30 m, DN 32434
  • 801237 To SBE 14 (from SBE 11 Remote Out), 100 m, DN 32433
  • 171890 To computer COM port (from SBE 11 Serial Data Uplink or 9600 Baud Uplink), null modem cable, 3 m (replaces 801428, DN 32798)
  • 17015 To AC power supply (U.S. Standard)
  • 17824 To AC power supply (European plug)

Mount Kits

SBE 9plus

  • To SBE 32C (compact)
    50145 SBE 9plus to SBE 32C Mount Kit (document 67069)
  • To SBE 32 (full size)
    50199 SBE 9plus to SBE 32 Extension Stand Mount Kit (document 67074)

SBE 11plus

  • To Electronics rack
    30017 Deck unit rack mount ear kit (document 67059)

Sensors to SBE 9plus

  • 50109  SBE 5T or 43 to 9plus Mount Kit
  • SBE 3 and 4 pair to SBE 9plus (vertical only)
    50083 Aluminum Mount Kit (contains 50084 and 50085)
    50084 Aluminum TC Sensor Mount Block Assembly
    50085 Aluminum TC Sensor Mount Bar Assembly
  • SBE 3 and 4 pair to SBE 9plus Aluminum (vertical or horizontal)
    50083.1 Aluminum Mount Kit (contains 50084.1 and 50085.1)
    50084.1 Aluminum TC Sensor Mount Block Assembly
    50085.1 Aluminum TC Sensor Mount Bar Assembly
  • SBE 3 and 4 pair to SBE 9plus Titanium (vertical or horizontal)
    50131 Titanium TC Sensor Mount Kit (contains 50132 and 50084.2)
    50132 Titanium TC Sensor Mount Bar Assembly
    50084.2 Titanium TC Sensor Mount Block Assembly
  • Bottom Contact Switch to SBE 9plus (vertical)
    50100 Bottom Contact Switch to SBE 9plus Housing Mount Kit
    50314 Bottom Contact Switch to CTD Cage Mount Kit

Spare Parts

  • 90199 CTD plumbing kit (document 67022)
  • 90088 CTD plumbing & TC duct tubing kit (document 67018)
    Note: This kit includes flexible tubing for plumbing TC duct, but does not include TC duct. For TC duct parts, see 90085 below.
  • 90085 TC duct & plumbing kit (document 67051)
  • 50070 O-ring kit (document 67009)
  • 50246 Conductivity disconnect fitting spare O-ring kit
  • 50089 Jackscrew kit
  • 50025 Pressure sensor oil refill kit (document 67066)
  • 50024 Hardware kit for SBE 9plus with aluminum housing (document 67053)
  • 50138 Hardware kit for SBE 9plus with titanium housing (document 67131)
  • varies Conductivity cell tube support kit (document 67068)
  • 50088 Seaspares kit for SBE 9plus with aluminum housing & XSG/AG connectors (hardware, O-rings, cables, dummy plugs, connectors, zinc anodes, fuses, etc.) (document 67025)
  • 50139 Seaspares kit for SBE 9plus with titanium housing & XSG/AG connectors (hardware, O-rings, cables, dummy plugs, connectors, fuses, etc.) (document 67128)
  • 50321 Seaspares kit for SBE 9plus with aluminum housing & wet-pluggable connectors (hardware, O-rings, cables, dummy plugs, connectors, zinc anodes, fuses, etc.) (document 67129)
  • 50322 Seaspares kit for SBE 9plus with titanium housing & wet-pluggable connectors (hardware, O-rings, cables, dummy plugs, connectors, fuses, etc.) (document 67130)
  • 31634 Hardigg shipping case (AL4915-1105) (photo of 9plus in this shipping case)

 

Compare Profiling CTDs (Conductivity, Temperature, and Pressure)

SBE Sampling Rate Channels for Auxiliary Sensors Memory Power Real-Time Data Comments
Internal External
SBE 911plus CTD (9plus CTD & 11plus Deck Unit) 24 Hz

8 A/D

16 Mb with optional SBE 17plus V2
(with optional SBE 17plus V2)
World's most accurate, high resolution CTD, premium sensors, multi-parameter support, water sampler control.
SBE 25plus Sealogger CTD 16 Hz 8 A/D;
2 RS-232
2 Gb
May require SBE 36 CTD Deck Unit & PDIM
High-resolution logging CTD with multi-parameter support. Water sampler control with SBE 33 Carousel Deck Unit.
SBE 25 Sealogger CTD
8 Hz 7 A/D 8 Mb
May require SBE 36 CTD Deck Unit & PDIM
Replaced by SBE 25plus in 2012. Water sampler control with SBE 33 Carousel Deck Unit.
SBE 19plus V2 SeaCAT Profiler CTD 4 Hz 6 A/D;
1 RS-232
64 Mb
May require SBE 36 CTD Deck Unit & PDIM
Personal CTD, small, self-contained, adequate resolution. Water sampler control with SBE 33 Carousel Deck Unit.
SBE 19plus SeaCAT Profiler CTD
4 Hz 4 A/D; optional PAR 8 Mb
May require SBE 36 CTD Deck Unit & PDIM
Replaced by SBE 19plus V2 in 2008. Water sampler control with SBE 33 Carousel Deck Unit.
SBE 19 SeaCAT Profiler CTD
2 Hz 4 A/D 1 - 8 Mb
May require SBE 36 CTD Deck Unit & PDIM
Replaced by SBE 19plus in 2001. Water sampler control with SBE 33 Carousel Deck Unit.
SBE 49 FastCAT CTD Sensor 16 Hz      
May require SBE 36 CTD Deck Unit & PDIM
For towed vehicle, ROV, AUV, or other autonomous profiling applications. Water sampler control with SBE 33 Carousel Deck Unit.
SBE 52-MP Moored Profiler CTD & (optional) Dissolved Oxygen Sensor 1 Hz 1 frequency channel for dissolved oxygen sensor 28,000 samples   Intended for moored profiling applications on device that is winched up and down from a buoy or bottom-mounted platform.
SBE 41/41CP CTD Module for Autonomous Profiling Floats (Argo) OEM CTD for sub-surface oceanographic float that surfaces at regular intervals, transmits new drift position and in situ measurements to ARGOS satellite system. CTD obtains latest temperature and salinity profile for transmission on each ascent. Also available is a Navis Autonomous Profiling Float, Navis BGC Autonomous Profiling Float with Biogeochemical Sensors, and Navis BGCi Autonomous Profiling Float with Integrated Biogeochemical Sensors
Glider Payload CTD (GPCTD) and Slocum Glider Payload CTD OEM CTD for autonomous gliders. Generic Glider Payload CTD (GPCTD) is modular, low-power profiling instrument that measures C, T, P, and (optional) Dissolved Oxygen. Slocum Glider Payload CTD provides retrofit/replacement for CTDs on Slocum gliders. Designs share many features, but there are differences in packaging, sampling abilities, power consumption, and installation (see individual data sheets).
Notes:
1. See Application Note 82: Guide to Specifying a CTD.
2. products are no longer in production. Follow the links above to the product page to retrieve manuals and application notes for these older products.